Monthly Archives: November 2008

Walt Whitman: Perfume and the Atmosphere – Form and Formlessness

Continued from Walt Whitman: Living the Paradox of Nonduality

Song of Myself continues. In the line preceding the lines that follow, Whitman was loafing, leaning, inviting his soul, observing a spear of summer grass. The sense was of solitude and focus. Now the next passage:

Houses and rooms are full of perfumes …. the shelves are crowded with perfumes,
I breathe the fragrance myself, and know it, and like it,
The distillation would intoxicate me also, but I shall not let it.

The atmosphere is not a perfume …. it has no taste of the distillation …. it is odorless,
It is for my mouth forever…. I am in love with it,
I will go to the bank by the wood and become undisguised and naked,
I am mad for it to be in contact with me.

From solitude to crowds, to the smells of life, humanity, and the world, Whitman likes it. He knows that if he lets his attention drop, he could be swallowed up by the concerns of man, worry, consumerism, desperation, and fear. He will not let that happen.

While he says he likes the perfume, he sings that it is the atmosphere that he loves. Forever he speaks from atmosphere itself, not from the crowd of perfumes. He speaks authentically, undisguised, naked. He is mad to know the atmosphere, to touch it and feel it touch him. Notice is now sent that this writing is not going to cater to the multitudes. This is not going to be a hack writing job that will find a place on a shelf with a thousand other perfumes. However, Song of Myself, too, is a perfume.

In the first lines of Song of Myself, Whitman revealed the paradox of nonduality, that we are the same — “Every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you” — and that everyone and every thing, every atom, is distinct and individual: “I lean and loafe at my ease….observing a spear of summer grass.”

We know and see how we are different. Each one of us, each and every thing is a perfume on the shelf. That’s the world. How easy is it to see we are all the same at the very same time that we are different?

Now Whitman is going deeper into the claim that we are the same. Our sameness is the atmosphere. To know the atmosphere is to know the nondual nature of reality. We hear talk of gurus stripping us of our egos, of standing naked before the truth, of shedding the veil that hides the truth. Whitman knows that to contact the atmosphere is to be natural, in nature — “by the bank of the wood,” where water meets soil, where man meets atmosphere — and “undisguised and naked.”

In the lines that follow, in case the reader hasn’t already realized it, Whitman declares the reader “shall possess the origin of all poems,” which is the atmosphere. The poems themselves are perfumes, each one different, each one arising from the same atmosphere, which now the reader, naked and undisguised in the mind, may come to know.

Perfume and atmosphere stand for form and formlessness, respectively. Song of Myself is the revelation that the perfume is the atmosphere, the atmosphere is the perfume, and that they are exactly each other. Joy and celebration are the natural emanations of this realization. Read the first few lines of Song of Myself and identify celebration, sameness, and distinct individuality:

I celebrate myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.

I loafe and invite my soul,
I lean and loafe at my ease….observing a spear of summer grass.

Yet Whitman says “The atmosphere is not a perfume.” He must make it clear that the perfume and the atmosphere are a duality in order for the atmosphere to be seen. Whitman must separate the water and the land. He must get the reader to see the two before seeing the one. He addresses contradiction later in Song of Myself in a famous passage beginning, “Do I contradict myself?”

Adi Da is Dead

from The Nonduality Highlights

Death of Adi DaAdi Da Mahasamadhi

What follows is a series of announcements that are out of chronological order and reproduced as received from my informant.

Dear Devotees,

It is the middle of the night here at Adi Da Samrajashram, devotees remain in what is now clearly the Mahasamadhi Vigil of Beloved Bhagavan Sapta Na Adi Da Samraj. The time of Beloved Bhagavan’s Divine Mahasamadhi is being placed at approximately 5:10 PM on Thursday, November 27th, 2008.

Everyone here has been shocked at how quickly the Mahasamadhi occurred. Bhagavan Adi Da was sitting in His Chair Working in Picture Perfect. Just a minute before, He had been Giving Instructions relative to His Divine Image Art. A few minutes before that, He had been speaking humorously and laughing. And then He silently fell over on His Side and within a very short period of no more than a couple of minutes, He had entered into His Mahasamadhi. Dr. Charles Seage and Dr. Andrew Dorfman diagnose that Beloved Bhagavan suffered a fatal heart attack. There were no signs of struggle, but a quick and painless transition.

Beloved Bhagavan had given no indications that He was going to be taking Mahasamadhi. Up until that point, He had been experiencing what seemed to be a normal day. He had been continuing His Divine Puja of preparing gifts for Danavira Mela earlier in the day, and had been in Picture Perfect for a good part of the day.

Beloved Bhagavan Adi Da’s Body is now sitting upright on His Bed in His Bedroom at Aham Da Asmi Sthan. He is draped in orange clothes.

The Ruchira Sannyasin Order and a few intimate devotees are sitting in the bedroom with Him. Devotees are also sitting on the veranda outside of His Room in silent meditative communion.

Beloved Bhagavan has previously Given Instructions that His Body is to be allowed to rest uninterferred with for a minimum of three days before it is taken to the Outshining “Brightness”, His Permanent Mahasamadhi resting place. The pre-burial Vigil may last longer, even for several weeks, if Beloved Bhagavan’s Body does not show signs of decay.

Ruchiradama Quandra Sukhapur has invited all to come to Naitauba during this time. Everyone is invited. All four congregations of devotees. And anyone else who wishes to come who will be rightly related to making this pilgrimage. This has all happened so quickly that we have not yet figured out how the practical details will be managed. But anyone who is moved to come to Naitauba to participate in Beloved Bhagavan’s Mahasamadhi Vigil should begin to consider their practical arrangements to make the pilgrimage.

As mentioned, there is no way to know exactly how long it will be before Beloved Bhagavan’s Divine Bodily Human Form will be Sacredly Interned at the Outshining “Brightness”. If the pre-burial Vigil only lasts the minimum period of three days, Beloved Bhagavan’s Divine Bodily Human Form could be Installed at the Outshining “Brightness” as early as late Sunday. So all who wish to be here for this Sacred Ceremony should begin to make immediate plans for the journey.

This is a very difficult time for all devotees and friends of Adi Da Samraj. Adi Da has always told us that His Mahasamadhi would be the time when He would most fully enter into His Divine Translation. He has said that it would be for Him a Divine Outshining of this Realm altogether. And He has also told us, that it would unleash a further Siddhi of His Divine Blessing. This is already being felt by devotees here at Adi Da Samrajashram. So even though this is one of the most difficult times that all devotees will ever experience, in terms of the Mahasamadhi of our Beloved Divine Master, it will also best also be a time in which we remain focused in our Divine whole bodily turning to Beloved Bhagavan. It feels here that somehow He is “holding up” all of His devotees to go through this moment with equanimity and continued reception of His Divine Blessing.


(From James Steinberg at Adi Da Samrajashram)

Om Sri Parama-Sapta-Na Adi Da Love-Ananda Hridayam

Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2008 11:37:39 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
Subject: Fwd: Adi Da Samraj Health Situation
Dear Fellow Devotees,

Praise to Beloved Bhagavan Adi Da Samraj.

At this moment Beloved Bhagavan Adi Da Samraj is experiencing an extreme medical crisis. We do not know the full extent of what is happening with His Divine Bodily Human Form. However, this crisis is an extreme one in which He has Swooned out of His Body. This has occurred to the extent that He has not had a heart-beat or pulse, for nearly an hour’s time. Medical procedures are not reviving Him.

Beloved Bhagavan Adi Da has in the past Approved a medical protocol relative to such a circumstance. He has made it plain that nothing should be done to interfere with His Bodily Human Form for an extended period of time, a minimum of three full days. This is because He may always and at any point resume ordinary Consciousness and Life. However, at this moment, He is not animating the body at all.

He was working in Picture Perfect at the Matrix, at Adi Da Samrajashram. It appeared to be a normal day, and He had been with the healers last night and was doing very well physically. He has actually been stronger and in better health over the past few weeks. Therefore it was a surprise when He simply collapsed, while working on His Divine Avataric Image Art.

As devotees know, Beloved Bhagavan Adi Da Samraj is a Divine Yogi. There is a long history of such beings having very unconventional “death events” or moments in their lives. We have seen this in Beloved Bhagavan’s Case in many circumstances in the past–the Ruchira Dham or Lopez Island Event, and the Divine Emergence, as merely two of them. Certainly it is the hope of this moment, as we write, that Beloved Bhagavan will Re-Enter His Body and begin a new Phase of His Work. It is our hope and intention that He will Re-Animate the Body and wake up.

Here at Adi Da Samrajashram we are all invoking and praying for Adi Da Samraj to resume His Bodily Functioning. Ruchiradama Quandra Sukhapur Rani has repeated to us, that His Motive in Returning to the Body will be devotees’ heart-need and calling. All devotees are asked at this moment to engage in a Vigil of Prayer and Invocation of Beloved Bhagavan Adi Da, and a Calling to Him to Stay here with us.

In the history of the Great Tradition, there have been many great Yogic Realizers who have dropped out of their bodies for an extended period of time, without heartbeat or pulse, and later Spiritual Revived. This was the case with Swami Nityananda in the 1920s. He left the body for many hours and was believed by many to have died. Upon returning, he declared that his work was simply not done. Also Shirdi Sai Baba left his body for a full three days in the 1880s, and upon returning there was a dramatic change in the fullness and potency of his work. Examples like this are numerous. And Adi Da Samraj is the Greatest of Master Yogis. Therefore we call upon devotees to invoke and call upon Adi Da Samraj with our full heart-need for His Continued Presence amongst us in Bodily Human Divine Form.

At this moment, Adi Da Samraj remains lying in horizontal position at Picture Perfect. The devotees here are gathered around the building, doing Vigil and calling upon Him to remain with us, with full heart need. Drs. Charles Seage and Andrew Dorfman are with Beloved Bhagavan, as well as the Ruchiradamas, and many devotees to assist in tending to Adi Da Samraj.

One recommended action you can take, is to go into your Communion Hall and invoke Beloved Bhagavan down into His Divine Body, through waving of lights, chanting, recitations, the Devotional Prayer of Changes, or simply heartfelt invocation and communion with Him.

We will continue to inform and update you as the evening progresses.

Om Sri Parama Sapta Adi Da Love-Ananda Hridayam

Subject: Update on Bhagavan Adi Da Samraj
To: All 1C / 2C Devotees ~

Dear devotees,

At 8 pm Fiji time, Lesley Huber, speaking on behalf of the Ruchira Sannyasin Order Authority Office, made the following communication:

“At approximately 5:10 pm Fiji time, while working with His Divine Image Art in Picture Perfect, it appears that Bhagavan Adi Da suffered a massive heart attack, and since that time has shown no heartbeat or pulse. At this time, 8 pm, medical intervention has been suspended in respect for the Divine Yogic Integrity of the Master’s Body.

Masters choose their time of relinquishing the body, and saints and realizers have returned after extended periods without apparent life signs.

At this point, all devotees should understand that this is a Divine Yogic matter, and participate accordingly. Devotees in Hermitage are in a deep Vigil in and around Picture Perfect, and it is essential that devotees worldwide likewise enter into a Vigil in their own places of Communion and Worship. We encourage devotees to gather, wherever possible, in the Empowered Halls of the gathering, and stay connected.”

We will continue to send further updates as they become available.

Om Sri Parama-Sapta-Na Adi Da, Love-Ananda Hridayam

Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2008 12:55 AM
Subject: Fwd: Further update

Update on Beloved Bhagavan Adi Da’s Condition

Beloved Bhagavan Adi Da Samraj’s Bodily Human Divine Form is now lying on His Bed in His Bedroom at Aham Da Asmi Sthan at the Matrix.

His Bodily Human Form was carried on a stretcher in silent procession from Picture Perfect to Aham Da Asmi Sthan. Beloved Bhagavan was covered with a sannyasin orange shawl during this time.

A number of devotees are now in the Bedroom with Adi Da Samraj keeping Vigil with lit deepa lamps. The rest of the Adi Da Samrajashram devotees are keeping Vigil outside on the veranda in front of the Darshan swing.

Please continue to invoke and call Adi Da Samraj to Reanimate His Divine Bodily Human Form for the sake of each of us and for the entire world.

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Walt Whitman: Living the Paradox of Nonduality

whitman_walt_1
In Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, he begins Song of Myself:

I celebrate myself,
And what I assume you shall assume,
For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.

I loafe and invite my soul,
I lean and loafe at my ease … observing a spear of summer grass.

These lines describe the paradox of nonduality and how to live.

The paradox is that while we are the same — “…what I assume you shall assume.” “…every atom belonging to to me as good belongs to you.” — everything is distinct: “observing a spear of summer grass.”

And how to live through the paradox? “…celebrate…” “…lean and loafe…” leaves-of-grass_mm

“I … invite my soul,” Whitman says. The soul is the paradox. It is who he is. Paradox is “myself.” “I celebrate myself.”

Read the second part of this treatment of Song of Myself.

Crib notes for understanding Nisargadatta

try, don’t try

need, no need

know, can’t know

only see

changeable, unchangeable

being, non-being

interest, no interest

keep quiet

questions, no questions

accept

know, don’t know

finite, infinite

no presence

being, non-being

unborn

cannot remember – never forgot

everything is unreal

silence

disappear

worldly, unworldly

understanding, cannot be understood

hold on, give up

something, nothing

destruction, indestructible

identification, identification gone

body identity, unborn

temporary, eternal

passing time

everything is, nothing is

reject, settle down

discard, have conviction

delay – fear

nothing is – true knowledge

Don’t take things seriously; give seriously

Someone mentioned to me that it’s useless to talk about nonduality to people in the general public, that when they’re ready to hear the teaching of nonduality, they’ll stumble across it.

To that person I said, I think you are working with concern for the fruits of your labors. Working without concern for the fruits of your labors is working seriously while not taking it seriously. Every criticism of my suggestion to mention nonduality in conversations, takes what I’m saying seriously. I don’t take it seriously. I’m only saying to do it seriously.

Put another way, don’t take seriously, rather give seriously. I don’t mean that in a New Age way that we must give to charities or help people. You don’t have to give a damn thing to charity. Giving means giving your expectations away, giving away the imagining that you’ve done something and have something.

To do something seriously without taking it seriously, is to give seriously. Don’t worry about giving to a charity or helping someone learn to read, since those actions are probably done with the expectation of something. When you act seriously without taking what you’re doing seriously, you come from joy and can effect human benefits way beyond giving a few dollars or a few hours of your time to those in need.

Links to Diunitality

The links alone:

http://abagond.wordpress.com/2011/10/17/diunital-cognition/

http://bookalist.net/?p=262739#

http://www.wdwrightbooks.com/

http://eshusplayground.tumblr.com/post/10916316458

http://www.sonoranresearchgroup.com/documents/Culturally_Engaged_Evaluation.ppt

http://prezi.com/dsjuwujg46ba/tupac-shakur/

https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=38&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CDwQFjAHOB4&url=http%3A%2F%2Fjournals.lub.lu.se%2Findex.php%2Felears%2Farticle%2Fdownload%2F7627%2F6301&ei=9H7CU7WrDtWsyASJq4HIBw&usg=AFQjCNGNERxepnmqgsbOu8DlgcRYfJ8gEA&sig2=Q_sIo9nLCjmSMlPGQInHJQ

http://bhaktitirthaswami.wikia.com/wiki/Reflections_on_Sacred_Teachings_IV:_Sri_Isopanisad

http://www.africanafrican.com/african%20american%20art/osu1228514505.pdf

 http://epublications.marquette.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1037&context=dissertations_mu

http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/11831_Chapter5.pdf


 

 

http://abagond.wordpress.com/2011/10/17/diunital-cognition/

Abagond

500 words a day on whatever I want

The following is based on chapter three of William D. Wright’s “Black Intellectuals, Black Cognition and a Black Aesthetic” (1997) with observations of my own added:

Diunital cognition is both-and thinking. Its opposite is dichotomous or either-or thinking. While most Americans are capable of both kinds, blacks favour diunital thinking while whites (and some of the black middle-class) favour dichotomous thinking.

A good example of the difference is Marie Laveau, the voodoo queen of New Orleans in the early 1800s. To white Catholics you cannot be a good Catholic and a voodoo queen at the same time. Either-or. Dichotomous. Yet Laveau was a believing Catholic who faithfully went to mass every day. That is diunital thinking. Both-and.

Or take the word “racist”. Whites can get extremely upset when you point out that they said something racist, no matter how gently or indirectly you try to make your point. It is like you called them a bad person. As if doing something racist means you cannot still be a good person. It is either-or. Dichotomous.

Dichotomous thinking sees the world as opposites:

  • good and evil,
  • right and wrong,
  • straight and gay,
  • white and black,
  • male and female,
  • civilized and savage,
  • rational and irrational,
  • sane and mad,
  • mind and body,
  • winners and losers,
  • capitalist and communist,
  • free and slave,
  • modern and backwards

And on and on. Not only that, but one of the two opposites is always seen as something bad and different, as something to avoid, overcome, control or even destroy.

Also common among whites is vertical thinking: they measure and rank things: IQ, income, crime rates, etc. Again, the aim is not to understand but to condemn and control. “The Bell Curve” is almost a self-parody of this style.

In diunital thinking you see things in their fullnessas being independent and equalDifferent does not mean unequal. Different is just different. In fact, to rank things would require looking at them in a flattened, one-dimensional way that does not tell the whole story. The world is a coat of many colours, not a coat of one colour that got screwed up. The aim is not to control or condemn but to understand as fully as possible.

Diunital thinking among Black Americans goes back at least to the 1800s – when they stopped calling themselves Africans and started to see themselves as both black and American. Both-and. Two-in-one. Diunital.  Compare that to the white, dichotomous view of blacks:

  • Black and therefore not truly American (either-or), or
  • Americans with a brown skin which they try not to “see” (“I do not see colour”) – because their dichotomous thinking does not allow them to see different as equal.

Diunital thinking does not go back to West Africa like you might expect. The main pattern of thought there is what Wright calls monointeractive. White scientists, dichotomously, understood it as “prelogical” thinking, as part of the “savage” mind. But it is hardly that: the “civilized” Ancient Egyptians also used it as their main pattern of thought.

See also:

14 Responses

  1. Oy vay, what a load the point ito a world view is how it helps a person navigate the world we live in both points are valid if the given view represents reality otherwise your asking idiots to juggle chainsaws

  2. Abagond:

    There is such a thing as “Right Thinking” and “Wrong Thinking.” Human thought should always have truth as the starting point. Emotion waters down the truth. As you stated, if black people speak honestly about race and racism in relation to white people, the natural tendency on their part is to get offended and start name-calling. Instead of dealing with the fundamental point of what was said, they resort to calling any particular sista or brotha a racist, bigot, close-minded, etc. My brain is my brain, my thoughts are my thoughts, my truth is my truth…I don’t care about conventional-wisdom, status-quo, groupthink, etc. Being logical and honest is hard, because, it means that you’re not gonna be liked by everybody…Too Bad! As human beings, we need to get rid of that mindset. A lot of foul ish takes place around the world because we’re afraid to connect the dots and speak honestly and forthright about this or that issue.

    Tyrone
    Human Nature…Fear…Fearlessness

  3. Either-or thinking is foolish and limiting, as the world is filled with varying shades of grey. Narrow-minded rigidity isn’t the answer.

  4. -Hmmm idk about this. This doesn’t seem to reflect what I have experienced living in the US. To me, it seems as if most Americans, black and white, are dichotomous thinkers. That type of thinking is widespread in our society.

    -Idk about vertical thinking. A lot of racist white ppl on the internet certainly think this way, but I don’t have any way of knowing if that reflects white America as a whole. I spend most of my time with other black ppl, so I’m kind of lost on “whiteness”. I’ve only been able to thoroughly peer into the white racist mindset through the internet and I have no idea of how much of the population they(racist white ppl) represent.

  5. Good piece, as always. I think the person named “The Cynic” is kind of right about most Americans being dichotomous thinkers, but I’d qualify that some– I think– and I’m totally just guessing– that a smaller percentage of black Americans than white are dichotomous as individuals. And I’d also say that if we were to try to think our way through to something that might satisfy as being a statement of the two cohorts– as those voices might speak NOW, we’d find the white voice fairly dichotomous and the black voice more diunital.

    I’m listening to highlights of the republican debate last night, and am hearing the Romney/Perry exchange about illegal immigration. (Now mind you, I’m glad to see the two of them making assholes of themselves and each other; where I remember a different mindset among many of the GOP, back when it had a moderate wing, now, I just find myself disliking practically everything I hear from these people and even when one of them does say a particular thing I’d like to feel good about, I find now that I am little more than suspicious. If the thing doesn’t seem to have an obvious ulterior motive, and it usually does, then I just wonder what I’m not seeing. I hope that will change some day, but I don’t expect it to happen soon.) And the thing is, there are things in Romney’s defense of his having had illegal immigrants working on his property that I don’t mind saying are, in themselves, reasonable– I live in L.A. and I can tell you for sure that most of the men– at least most of the men I see– who work for landscapers are Latinos who were clearly not born in the U.S., and the odds are that a good percentage of them are here without documents. That being the case, I’d like to give Romney the benefit of the doubt on that point, because that’s my style when considering anyone, but then I immediately ask myself where the hell the nuance or the understanding of others is when these right wing jack offs are out there debating in front of right wing audiences.

    It’s kind of related to the way I see the larger immigration issue: I agree that a sovereign nation must be able to control its borders and determine whom may be offered entry and residence and whom it these benefits will be denied to, but I see absolutely no willingness to take anything beyond their own selfishly defined point of view. There’s no effort to consider the conditions in Latin America, and especially in Mexico, today; there’s no effort to consider the history that exists between the two nations, most particularly, how Texas became part of the U.S. and then how enormous parts of northern Mexico were stolen by our forbears after the U.S. war and the treaty that followed. See now, to me, taking both these issues into account– the need of the U.S. to set a border policy and the need of the U.S. to consider its obligations to a neighboring country and in particular, a neighbor in which there is a long, sordid, and one sided history. In fact, I find doing this not just the only way to see anything; i.e., that the diunital view is the only one that allows me a clear view of any social phenomenon, but I also find it’s not really that hard to do. I mean, how we would reform our policy towards Mexico and Mexicans would surely be complex and difficult, it’s a hell of a lot easier to me to imagine doing that than it is to adopt such a one sided policy, the simplicity of which has led to all the suffering that exists on our border and more importantly, to those who live on the other side of it.

    There’s a hell of a lot I’d like to say about the same subject as it relates to the history and the relationship between white and black Americans. I respect “The Cynic,” Tyrone, and Abagond for the three dimensional views each takes; I mean, I especially like Abagond’s observation that one can be racist in some ways and still be a good person– if more whites understood that, we could make some progress on the issue but for many, many complex factors, all of which essentially come down to what white America sees as its own interests, it’s hard to picture the white America of today being able to do that. I do think that a generation or two from now, though, that we’ll make some real progress there. As far as “The Cynic’s” question about white America, I have to say that while the stuff you see on the internet probably reflects the slice of white America that is more angry and weak and frustrated, I’d add that the basic assumptions you can infer from the kind of stuff you see posted there is probably pretty much in sync with the majority of those in white America today, though I’m speaking primarily of my generation, Gen X, the ones ahead of us, and the one just behind us. I think many of today’s kids are a little bit past where we are, but when they go out into the world, the racism they’ve absorbed will probably emerge as they try to create an identity in adult society.

    Abagond’s various posts about white America strike me as largely correct; in fact, I rarely read the things he posts and disagree with them. His tone is one that many whites will find too intimidating to listen to and as a result of that, most of today’s whites, reading Abagond, would automatically shift into a defensive posture in which they would reply to every general statement with a claim of how many examples they know that contradict the rule, and they’d reply to each anecdote with the claim that whatever it revealed didn’t reflect the opinion of EVERY white person. They’d miss the whole lesson, is what I mean, which is unfortunate but not surprising. I like the fact that every few posts, Abagond reminds the reader that his blog is not for whites; it’s for himself and for other black Americans. I think he’s totally right, and I’d add that it’s a great place for white Americans to learn; I’ve learned more here in about eighteen months than I think I’ve learned from probably every other thing I’ve read or studied on these subjects put together. That sounds like an exaggeration, but I don’t think it is; there’s something about the combination of what he writes, the force with which he writes it, and my personally being ready to have received the message that simply makes things clear that I haven’t encountered elsewhere.

    So thanks, Abagond, though I didn’t mean for this to have wended its way to this point. I hope you keep this up because though I understand, I think, your reasons for writing this, I can tell you for sure that you’re offering more to white America than either you or it can probably begin to understand in 2011. While I realize that’s not your point in doing this blog, I still say it’s a hell of a valuable blog and that down the line– way down the line, like I mean, in ten or twenty years, this is going to be something that is going to make a huge difference in race relations in the U.S.

  6. Very interesting that the book you referred to covered this. The dichotomization within rhe culture was touched on in Marimba Ani’s Yurugu as well.

    Quote:
    “And here [with Plato] begins a pattern that runs with frighteningly predictable consistency through European thought, continually gathering momentum for ages to come. The mind is trained from birth to think in terms of dichotomies or “splits”. The splits become irreconcilable, antagonistic opposites. Holistic conceptions become almost impossible given this mindset. First the dichotomy is presented, then the process of valuation occurs in which one term is valued and the other is devalued. One is considered “good”, positive, superior; the other is considered “bad”, negative, inferior. And, unlike the Eastern (Zen) conception of Yin and Yang or the African principle of “twinness” these contrasting terms are not conceived as complementary and necessary parts of a whole. They are, instead, conflicting and “threatening” to one another”
    END

    Within this society, I get the sense that past and present are dichotomized as well. It’s as if the past if viewed as obsolete: the “march of time” consuming it and discarding it. It is bad to “hold on to the past” and when something is “in the past” it is somehow less relevant (though EVERYTHING that HAPPENS is in the past, by definition). Another view is that the past is always present. This post which was certainly written in the past, influences the present as it is read. Thus, the present owes the very nature of its existence to the past. That is a complementary view rather than an antagonistic “split”. It seems reasonable that the former would lead to a more traditional stability while the latter would fuel a desire for “progress” away from devalued term.

  7. Of course Bulanik, Abagond suffers also a bit from dichotomous thinking. As such calling people “black” or “white”, is not helping racial tensions, negro and muzungu or paleface would make it much easier to indicate groups, without stressing antagonistic images.

    Giving a white teddybear to your fiancee at the engagement party seems still
    a very curious mzungu novelty in Kenya, if I am not mistaken.

  8. Interesting.

  9. Interesting post. It might be fair to say that (white) American culture is a dichotomous culture. We tend to love our villain/hero narratives. The cold war was built on it, and every war since then. Our movies, television, etc., reflect this. Stephen Spielberg built an empire on this narrative: save the kids from the evil monsters.

    It’s an immature worldview, the view of a boy rather than a man. A man knows that men are generally neither all good nor all bad; rather, most contain elements of both good and bad.

  10. Fascinating stuff! Thanks for the cool post, Abagond.

  11. I think this comes up again wrt to Abagond’s ‘reading while white’ post and the instinctive insertion of “ALL” before “white people”. There are the dichomotous thought patterns again: “all” or “none” not gradations of patterns of behavior among various individuals. I like to use the word ‘culture’ a lot because it is a template that tends to produce individuals that think and act in a certain way. Obviously, the degree of immersion and uptake may vary from person to person. There may even be people who defy the pattern entirely but they must necessarily be extremely rare or else the culture could not survive. The cultural personality of Euro-America is racist because its imperialism (which is its highest aim) is rationalized by racism and the doctrine of white supremacy. As a result, it is very unlikely for one who identifies with this culture to not be racist in any way. That does not mean every white person is a secret member of the Klan. But it is hard for white people to read these things and not feel that that is what is being suggested. It’s “all” or “nothing”, “good” or “bad”, “Klan member” or “not seeing color at all”.

  12. Origin, you hit the nail on the head with this:
    The cultural personality of Euro-America is racist because its imperialism (which is its highest aim) is rationalized by racism and the doctrine of white supremacy. As a result, it is very unlikely for one who identifies with this culture to not be racist in any way.

    Exactly. This ties in with the self-hating non-whites who have embraced said culture, ‘sold out’ so as to be accepted into said culture, thus being/becoming acceptable to the ‘majority’. The acceptance only lasts as long as the self-haters continue to destroy their very sense of self, but they maintain the delusion that they’ve finally ‘broken through the glass ceiling’. Sadly though, when the harsh reality sets in, suicide is the only answer – after all, isn’t that the ultimate act of self-destruction?
    I’m going to explore this thought further on my blog at a later date…

  13. […] be, not “in spite of” what makes them different. They see colour, but they also see that different is just different, not “less […]


    http://racism-101.livejournal.com/89255.html

    01 October 2011 @ 11:34 pm
    diunital cognition, dichotomous society

    Earlier this year, I came across a term that sums up the deepest source of conflict when it comes to simply communicating with people who are not Black. That term is diunital cognition (also known as diunital reasoning, diunital logic, and diunital worldview).

    In short, it’s a “both/and” rather than “either/or” (dichotomous) worldview, but of course it’s more complicated than that. It’s a fascinating topic on its own, especially how it names, defines, and validates the surviving Africanisms in diaspora African people and communities. This is not just a cultural form, but an entire worldview. The fact that it still exists is frankly miraculous.

    As amazing as these implications are, I want to talk about how this worldview tends to come into conflict with the dominant dichotomous worldview.

    Case in point: The reaction to Melissa Harris-Perry’s article about the racial dynamics of how White liberals talk about President Obama.

    In the dominant dichotomous discourse, people are either racist (bad) or not racist (good). So when a person tells someone with this dichotomous worldview that something they said or did could have racist implications, they see a challenge to their moral worth and thus their humanity. So, here come the “Prove racism exists” and the “I have Black friends” and the “I studied This or That Black Author” and the quotes from Martin Luther King. Not to mention the accusations of “reverse racism” and the chips on shoulders and the hating White people and so on.

    And this leaves Black folks hurt, frustrated, tired, and confused when we see White people arguing vehemently against points we never made – and making the same damn arguments each and every time. And from there, we either lash out or shut down. To be frank, it’s more often the latter than the former.

    This is not an excuse, just an observation.

    What a dichotomous discourse fails* to recognize or acknowledge are the nuances and complexities of a diunital worldview, which can reveal themselves in subtle ways.

    (*This is not to say that dichotomous discourse is useless. It is quite valuable in many, many circumstances – especially when finding information, interpreting events, or making decisions based on empirical evidence. The problem with dichotomous thinking is that it has dominated the way Western imperialist societies have interpreted the world even when it doesn’t fit the reality.)

    In these conversations, the dichotomous worldview presents a constant drive for an absolute answer, that final verdict. There is a push to resolve the question once and for all. Which is fine, if that’s what everyone agrees to. But what often happens is that dichotomous logic is assumed to be operating, so you have the inevitable conflict between racist (bad) and not racist (good) people and actions, with the drive to prove this or that racist (bad)/not racist (good) once and for all.

    Speaking only for myself, until proven otherwise (and this may be a personal failing of mine), I assume a certain level of basic human decency. But, like all humans, people make mistakes that don’t always reflect their good intentions or their values. Being a Good Person(TM) does not prevent anyone from doing or saying something harmful, hurtful, or flat-out wrong. If I were convinced that the person I’m about to speak to is an unrepentant bigot, I would not bother wasting my time. So if you’re not an unrepentant bigot, but a person who’s genuinely trying to do the right thing, it doesn’t strike me as necessary to constantly make that explicit if I don’t want people to lose their shit.

    (Come to think of it, I’d be insulted if someone did to me what I’m expected to do for White people – that is, reassure them of their essential goodness even as (or perhaps more than) I criticize their behavior. Maybe I’m weird, but that’s not how I treat grown-ass people. You do that shit with small children who are still learning the difference between unacceptable behavior and unacceptable person.)

    But, I digress.

    More often than not, when I approach these things, I do so with the intent of exploring the different facets of whatever we’re talking about.
    You can see it on Tumblr. Take any discussion amongst Black women about our experiences as Black women. There is a richness and a vitality to the way our discussions unfold, whether online or in person. Not just in how we speak, but also in the way we listen. When you have a chance to observe and reflect, it’s a thing of beauty. However, this beauty requires a specific environment to thrive, and part of that environment is a diunital worldview.

    You know what’s fascinating about these discussions? You don’t see a lot of debate. There can be differences of opinion, but not to the extent of trying to render the other participants’ experiences and perspectives invalid. In fact, the reaction to those who try to introduce that to the discussion is often quite harsh. That’s not because we’re Angry Black Women looking for an internet fight, but because this behavior is experienced as an invasive attack on how we understand and process our experiences. It’s policing, but it’s healthy policing, much in the same way that our immune systems resist harmful viruses and bacteria.

    Of course, what a dichotomous worldview sees is not a different way of relating and communicating that has its own rules of engagement, but us being hostile (bad) when they were just trying to have a discussion (good). So, rather than expanding and enriching the conversation, what we get is a reductive, simplistic dynamic that renders it impossible to address anything except the most banal and vapid aspects of our experiences.

    Hence, “shut up and listen.”

    ( 7 comments — Leave a comment )

    Firebirdfirebird5 on October 2nd, 2011 04:43 am (UTC)
    Yes, yes and yes. Beautiful analysis of an issue that is so prevalent both online and in RL. And good conclusion 🙂

    (Reply) (Thread) (Link)

    tea berry-bluezia_narratora on October 2nd, 2011 05:39 am (UTC)
    I never knew there was a word for this, and while it’s something I’ve definitely observed, I don’t think I ever thought about it in terms of the fact that it is something we do with children: “you are not bad, but this thing you did was bad.”Thank you for the definition and the really interesting reflection on it!

    (Reply) (Thread) (Link)

    Being the ramblings of D.gmdreia on October 2nd, 2011 06:48 am (UTC)
    Unconditional Positive Regard. Carl Rogers. Humanistic psychology.:)Versus: zero-sum thinking.

    Narahtemily_shore on October 2nd, 2011 10:20 am (UTC)
    This is a very interesting concept, thanks for sharing it. If I can be intersectional here, do you think the diunital approach helps Black people avoid falling into traps when it comes to discussing other forms of oppression? In other words, are Black men less likely to do the sexist/not-sexist thing? Or straight Black people less likely to try to break things down into homophobic/not homophobic?

    (Reply) (Thread) (Link)

    afro_dyteafro_dyte on October 2nd, 2011 10:47 am (UTC)
    I’m not positive, to tell the truth. I tend to keep to politically progressive circles. However, in that crowd, I see fewer Black people fall into that pattern when speaking with other Black people than I see White people who get trapped in it all too predictably.

    hédonisme libertairemmoneurere on October 3rd, 2011 12:04 am (UTC)
    This has made me think about both my own position of privilege and my strategies for working contrary to that privilege WRT both myself and my similarly-privileged (in this case: white) peers. The “basic human decency” you refer to is important — not as a state, but as an important aspiration. It’s a matter of turning it from a noun to a verb — there are plenty of privileged people (and I’m often one of that crowd, on more than one axis) who rely on our own sense of “goodness” (which mostly translates as “meaning well”, if that) as a “good enough” position. But for anyone who’s in a position of privilege (and white privilege is rather enormous in my country of residence), “meaning well” isn’t good enough — at best, it’s a matter of recognition that work still needs to be done, and that the work in question should (ethically, at least) be an obligation towards those of us who enjoy the position of privilege.IOW, when simplifying for the benefit of white friends who want to be non-racist: “We can be non-racist when our whiteness doesn’t open doors, break down walls, and otherwise give us special benefits. Until then, we are responsible for our privilege, even if we’d like to think we don’t want or need that privilege.” Maybe it involves an appeal to ego (“If you and I are really so fabulous, wouldn’t we do well even in a radically anti-racist culture?”); but won’t that at least be progress towards a worthwhile goal?

    (Reply) (Thread) (Link)

    Postmodern Girl Cartographermadmoisellestar on October 4th, 2011 01:26 pm (UTC)
    Thanks. 
    Really cool post. Thanks.The assumption that conversation means debate is insidious and pervasive. That’s something I’m going to try to be more aware of.

    http://bookalist.net/?p=262739#

    BLACK INTELLECTUALS, BLACK COGNITION, AND A BLACK AESTHETIC – WILLIAM D. WRIGHT – PDF, EPUB, FREE DOWNLOAD EBOOK AND AUDIOBOOK


    http://www.wdwrightbooks.com/

    Dr. W. D. Wright, a professor emeritus of history at Southern Connecticut State University and author of “Crisis of the Black Intellectual,” “Critical Reflections on Black History,” “Black History and Black Identity,” “Racism Matters,” “Black Intellectuals, Black Cognition and a Black Aesthetic,” “Historians and Slavery; A Critical Analysis of Perspectives and Irony in American Slavery and Other Recent Works.” He earned a Ph.D. from State University of New York at Buffalo. http://www.wdwrightbooks.com/Blog.html

    Diunital worldview and how people (mis)interpret Black communication

    Earlier this year, I came across a term that sums up the deepest source of conflict when it comes to simply communicating with people who are not Black. That term is diunital cognition (also known as diunital reasoning, diunital logic, and diunital worldview).

    In short, it’s a “both/and” rather than “either/or” (dichotomous) worldview, but of course it’s more complicated than that. It’s a fascinating topic on its own, especially how it names, defines, and validates the surviving Africanisms in diaspora African people and communities. This is not just a cultural form, but an entire worldview. The fact that it still exists is frankly miraculous.

    As amazing as these implications are, I want to talk about how this worldview tends to come into conflict with the dominant dichotomous worldview.

    Case in point: The reaction to Melissa Harris-Perry’s article about the racial dynamics of how White liberals talk about President Obama.

    In the dominant dichotomous discourse, people are either racist (bad) or not racist (good). So when a person tells someone with this dichotomous worldview that something they said or did could have racist implications, they see a challenge to their moral worth and thus their humanity. So, here come the “Prove racism exists” and the “I have Black friends” and the “I studied This or That Black Author” and the quotes from Martin Luther King. Not to mention the accusations of “reverse racism” and the chips on shoulders and the hating White people and so on.

    And this leaves Black folks hurt, frustrated, tired, and confused when we see White people arguing vehemently against points we never made – and making the same damn arguments each and every time. And from there, we either lash out or shut down. To be frank, it’s more often the latter than the former.

    This is not an excuse, just an observation.

    What a dichotomous discourse fails* to recognize or acknowledge are the nuances and complexities of a diunital worldview, which can reveal themselves in subtle ways.

    (*This is not to say that dichotomous discourse is useless. It is quite valuable in many, many circumstances – especially when finding information, interpreting events, or making decisions based on empirical evidence. The problem with dichotomous thinking is that it has dominated the way Western imperialist societies have interpreted the world even when it doesn’t fit the reality.)

    Speaking only for myself, and only for conversations about racism, it starts before I even open my mouth or hit “reply” in a discussion. Until proven otherwise (and this may be a personal failing of mine), I assume a certain level of basic human decency. If I were convinced that the person I’m about to speak to is an unrepentant bigot, I would not bother wasting my time. So if you’re not an unrepentant bigot, but a person who’s genuinely trying to do the right thing, it doesn’t strike me as necessary to constantly make that explicit if I don’t want people to lose their shit.

    Come to think of it, I’d be insulted if someone did to me what I’m expected to do for White people – that is, reassure them of their essential goodness even as (or perhaps more than) I criticize their behavior. Maybe I’m weird, but that’s not how I treat grown-ass people. You do that shit with small children who are still learning the difference between unacceptable behavior and unacceptable person.

    But, I digress.

    In these conversations, the dichotomous worldview presents a constant drive for an absolute answer, that final verdict. There is a push to resolve the question once and for all. Which is fine, if that’s what everyone agrees to. But that’s not always the case. More often than not, when I approach these things, I do so with the intent of exploring the different facets of whatever we’re talking about.

    You can see it right here on Tumblr. Take any discussion amongst Black women about our experiences as Black women. There is a richness and a vitality to the way our discussions unfold, whether online or in person. Not just in how we speak, but also in the way we listen. When you have a chance to observe and reflect, it’s a thing of beauty. However, this beauty requires a specific environment to thrive, and part of that environment is a diunital worldview.

    You know what’s fascinating about these discussions? You don’t see a lot of debate. There can be differences of opinion, but not to the extent of trying to render the other participants’ experiences and perspectives invalid. In fact, the reaction to those who try to introduce that to the discussion is often quite harsh. That’s not because we’re Angry Black Women looking for an internet fight, but because this behavior is experienced as an invasive attack on how we understand and process our experiences. It’s policing, but it’s healthy policing, much in the same way that our immune systems resist harmful viruses and bacteria.

    Of course, what a dichotomous worldview sees is not a different way of relating and communicating that has its own rules of engagement, but us being hostile (bad) when they were just trying to have a discussion (good).

    I would like to get into how a diunital worldview influences religious outlooks, particularly as it relates to my Jewish journey. But that’s for another time.


    . In some of the cross-cultural psychological literature diunital reasoning is sometimes known as cognitive dissonance (Valle, 1998). Described by Myers (1988), diunital reasoning is the skill of recognizing the validity of two competing, even exclusionary, world views

    Culturally Engaged Evaluation http://www.sonoranresearchgroup.com/documents/Culturally_Engaged_Evaluation.ppt


    Timothy Brown: Tupac’s music employs three values, oral tradition, a diunital orientation, and spirituality. http://prezi.com/dsjuwujg46ba/tupac-shakur/

     


    https://www.google.ca/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=38&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CDwQFjAHOB4&url=http%3A%2F%2Fjournals.lub.lu.se%2Findex.php%2Felears%2Farticle%2Fdownload%2F7627%2F6301&ei=9H7CU7WrDtWsyASJq4HIBw&usg=AFQjCNGNERxepnmqgsbOu8DlgcRYfJ8gEA&sig2=Q_sIo9nLCjmSMlPGQInHJQ

    Diunital Thinking
    On the other hand, diunital logic, or the union of opposites,” encompasses “both/and” (Ani 13) rather than “either/or” conclusions. Consequently, it emphasizes an expressive mode that is “dialogic,” such as call-and-response (Elbow 103). This Afrocentric worldview is called diunital because it assumes the “interrelatedness and interdependence of all things,” yielding a worldview that is “holistic” (Myers 4) rather than fragmented. African philosophy (forming the basis of African American culture)
    consequently holds that the mind and the spirit, or emotions, are not antagonistic, neither is is one valued more highly than the other. Rather, the so-called opposites – intellect and emotion – are viewed as “complementary and necessary parts of a whole” (Ani 33). The aim in Afrocentric thought is to achieve “balance of complementary,” seemingly “antagonistic,” forces in humans (35), which John S. Mbiti refers to as “paradoxical complementarity” (32).

    After traveling the journey to self-awareness, the hero, LT Benjamin Williams (Ben), adopts an epistemological framework rooted in what Linda James Myers refers to as “diunital thinking” based on a cosmological view that “contains and transcends all opposites” (34) and that enables him to discover that he cannot know himself without an awareness of his being a part of a larger communal experience encompassing his ancestral past.

     


     

    Sri Isopanisad – Mantra Two Edit

    • Since time immemorial, questions regarding the relationship between free will and destiny have plagued the minds of great philosophers. How do we reconcile these two apparently contradictory concepts: free will and destiny? In the higher realms of understanding, any deep philosophical or spiritual subject matter will present seemingly paradoxical perspectives at first. However, the more we genuinely explore and analyze these questions, we see that their resolutions lie less in the realm of ‘either/or,’ and more in an interplay between both concepts. Some contemporary philosophers call such an idea ‘diunital,’ as it encapsulates seemingly opposing terms. Often, when we study different polarities, we notice that taken together, they give us a greater understanding of the whole. This is particularly applicable to the nature of the soul and of God. For example, sometimes it may seem that God’s laws for governing the universe are at odds with those prescribed by humankind, but if we explore the situation in a prayerful mood, we will often be able to appreciate the congruency that emerges between them. http://bhaktitirthaswami.wikia.com/wiki/Reflections_on_Sacred_Teachings_IV:_Sri_Isopanisad

     


    Therefore this study explores the impact of the Black Power concept upon the
    historical and cultural context of the art and visual culture of the Black Arts Movement. It
    therefore aims to provide insights about how these visual artifacts anticipated
    fundamental assumptions of Africentric epistemologies, such as: 1) self-knowledge is the
    basis of all knowledge, 2) diunital logic under girds reality which is at once spiritual and
    material; and 3) racism is a sub-optimal response to reality.

    —————–

    http://www.africanafrican.com/african%20american%20art/osu1228514505.pdf

    Diunital Logic/Diunital Thinking
    Diunital or “both/and” logic reflects understanding of the interconnectivity
    between all phenomena, real and spiritual. W. D. Wright (2002) argues that
    diunital organizational logic is at the heart of what he describes is Black
    cognition. In Optimal Theory, Myers (1993) defines a diunital mode of thinking
    as more optimal than either/or or dualistic thinking which promotes hierarchies
    and fragmentation. Diunital conveys the notion that diverse realities interact and
    they are not always contradictory.

     


     

     http://epublications.marquette.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1037&context=dissertations_mu
    Theologians have begun to outline a traditionally African religious perspective that would have influenced African American Christianity.61
    61 Drawing from the blended identity of African and American, M. Shawn Copeland describes what she considers the most essential characteristics of an African American Christian worldview: creative and tensive holding of the sacred and secular, without separation or dilution; profound respect for all human life and
    interpersonal relationships; individual identity formation from and in relation to community, along with regard
    for the wisdom of elders; empathetic, symbolic, diunital, and associative understanding; unity of being and doing; commitment to freedom and liberation due to centuries of oppression and communal and personal anxiety; ambiguous toleration and transcendence of a notion of limited reward in the context of slavery and stigmatized social history; indirection and discretion in speech and behavior; affirmation of styling: intentional or unintentional improvisation in language, gestural, or symbolic mannerisms to favorably affect the receipt of a message. See M. Shawn Copeland, “Body, Representation, and Black Religious Discourse,” in Postcolonialism, Feminism, and Religious Discourse, eds. Laura E. Donaldson and Kwok Pui-lan (New York: Routledge, 2002), 189. Joseph Brown claims that central to African culture and therefore religion are the drumand-dance-based religious expression, mystical forms of prayer, and the sense that all of creation contains the power of the divine and that this power is to be used for healing that which has been wounded and for the restoration of balance to that which has been perverted and distorted. Brown, To Stand on the Rock, 87. See also Phelps, “African American Culture,” 49-52, for how African American philosophical psychologists, sociologists, and political scientists studying the African American world have identified a distinct African American cultural world of behavior, ideas, values and meaning which, while not unique, evidence themselves with some consistency in the African American community and connect it with African and other African diaspora cultures.

Science and Nonduality: Minding the trip

What are the main themes to consider when organizing science and nonduality? The first job is to differentiate science and nonduality from science and consciousness.

There is a body of literature and work on science and consciousness. The focus is on experiences, phenomena, mystical states and possibilities, things like communicating with animals, accessing the quantum mind, tripping on the mind, relaxing the mind, developing mental abilities, accessing the potential of the mind, studying the brain and neurology. “Tripping on the mind” says it all. That’s the hallmark of “science and consciousness.”

The hallmark of “science and nonduality” is more like “minding the trip.” That is, asking “whose mind?” “What mind?” “What experience?” “Who is fascinated with the play of consciousness?”

Science and consciousness is a trip down the rabbit hole that stops on a spacious ledge.

The work of science and nonduality is a deeper ride down the rabbit hole, through a small door that leads beneath the tripping on mind and goes far down. How far? As Greg Goode might say, “All the way!”

Here are a few quotations that would set the tone for a body of work on science and nonduality:

This is a fragment of dialogue between a Devotee and Ramana Maharshi:

D: Is not meditation better than investigation?

M: Meditation implies mental imagery, whereas investigation
is for the Reality. The former is objective, whereas the
latter is subjective.

D: There must be a scientific approach to this subject.

M: To avoid unreality and seek Reality is scientific.

D: I mean there must be a gradual eliminaton, first of the
mind, then of the intellect, and finally of the ego.

M: The Self alone is Real. All others are unreal. The mind
and the intellect do not remain apart from you.
The Bible says, “Be still and know that I am God.” Stillness
is the sole requisite for realization of the Self as God.

~ ~ ~

from “The Way of Chuang Tzu,” trans Merton:

*The Lost Pearl*

The Yellow Emperor went wandering
To the north of the Red Water
To the Kwan Lun mountain. He looked
around
Over the edge of the world. On the way
home
He lost his night-colored pearl.
He sent out Science to seek his pearl,
and got nothing.
He sent Analysis to look for his pearl,
and got nothing.
He sent out Logic to seek his pearl,
and got nothing.
Then he asked Nothingness, and
Nothingness had it!
The Yellow Emperor said:
“Strange, indeed: Nothingness
Who was not sent
Who did no work to find it
Had the night-colored pearl!”

~ ~ ~

William Blake wrote in the introduction to “Jerusalem,”

Poetry fetter’d Fetters the Human Race
Nations are Destroy’d or Flourish in proportion as
Their Poetry, Painting and Music are Destroy’d or Flourish:
The primeval state of Man was Wisdom, Art and Science.”

Wisdom precedes art as art precedes science. Wisdom is consciousness of being itself; it cannot be qualified, conditioned, or defined, for it is intrinsic to being itself. Art is the reflexive state of wisdom; it is the natural and spontaneous expression of being. Science is the way of materially implementing the reflexive state of wisdom. In awakened human consciousness these three form a unified whole. But in our own time science precedes art, and the practice of art precedes the realization of wisdom; and the three are no longer related as a unified system of knowledge. By Blake’s terms, the state we live in is the utter reversal of man’s natural state… (from this untitled work)

~ ~ ~

Science and nonduality is about self-realization or knowing who you are. That goes for the scientist. Anyone exploring science and nonduality has to find out their true nature or who they are. They can’t just trip on the mind and all kinds of cool things about consciousness. They need to go beneath that.