#5269 – Ivan M. Granger

 

ivanbook

 

Ivan M. Granger is a poet, a modern mystic, and founder and editor of Poetry Chaikhana, a publishing house and online resource of sacred poetry:
www.poetry-chaikhana.com/

He selects and presents the highest quality of sacred poetry from diverse times, eras, and civilizations.

You’ll hear Ivan about the nature of sacred poetry, read some poems, and share passionate commentaries.

Ivan Granger is the author of The Longing in Between: Sacred Poetry from Around the World (A Poetry Chaikhana Anthology) goo.gl/a7gl20

Tracks

00:00 – 5:10 Introduction. Purpose and nature of Poetry Chaikhana. Ivan’s perspective on sacred poetry as personal, conversational, and mystically inclined.

5:10 – 7:56 Ivan’s view of sacred poetry as alchemical more than intellectual.

7:56 – 16:52 What is sacred poetry? Ivan reads a poem and comments.

16:52 – 20:28 Coleman Barks discussed. Ivan’s desire to introduce the public to great sacred poetry besides the few that are well known such as those by Rumi. How Ivan started the Poetry Chaikhana project.

20:28 – 24:58 Ivan talks about his own poetry and writing journey, especially the nature of metaphors in sacred poetry.

24:58 – 30:24 Ivan reads and discusses a haiku.

30:24 – 38:03 Poet Gabriel Rosenstock discussed and his haiku read and discussed. The centrality of longing within the spiritual journey.

38:03 – 44:45 Poets Dorothy Walters and Elizabeth Reninger discussed. Ivan reads one of Elizabeth’s poems, Bird Bath.

44:45 – 45:40 Ivan talks about doing poetry readings.

45:40 – 49:42 Ivan reads a poem from Lalla and discusses it in relation to his own searching. Longing recognizing itself.

49:42 – 52:41 Ivan reads one of his poems, Parched, and talks about it. He also reads his poem Holy Ground and expands on its meaning in relation to the experience of emptiness rather than a structure of some sort.

52:41 – Ivan talks about sacred poetry as culturally important, especially with regard to religion, as it lets one see the mystic heart of all religions. Closing words and music.

Video versions with photographs synchronized to the text, may be viewed in two parts:

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